1984

Big Brother Is Watching You.

Fortunately for us, this statement is utterly false. It is not the year 1984 and there is no man named Big Brother watching our every move. There is no “Thought Police” that can incriminate you for even having negative thoughts against the government. There is no language called “New Speak” which tries to eradicate human thought and emotion by dumbing down the English language. Children are not taught to spy on their parents at school, and there is no “Room 101” that holds our deepest and darkest secrets.

I recently listened to the audiobook of 1984 by George Orwell and was compelled to write about it. 1984 is one of the most chilling novels written in the 20th century; a novel that carries very strong 21st century relevance. Many famous movies have been based on the novel, such as “Minority Report” in which police officers travel back in time and arrest criminals before they actually commit crimes. 1984 is also referenced heavily when it comes to politics. The next time you read an article on the news about a law that will grant the government more power to watch over its citizens (think about the Patriot Act in which the US Government can spy on its citizens if they suspect you are a terrorist) hear carefully for the word: “Big Brother.”

The novel is cold and chilling, and dehumanizing to the human soul. Feelings such as love are crushed in the novel, and it ends very tragically as well. I feel that Orwell’s message of the book was twofold; to warn us of future totalitarian governments as well as encouraging us to value the freedom of our every-day lives and to truly live life (as the protagonist is not able to).

As much as people say that the US government mirrors something like that of Big Brother, they are totally mistaken. For the most part, we can spew our thoughts about anything our blogs or even speak up against the government without fear of execution (although we may be arrested). We therefore have a huge sense of freedom in our every-day lives. If we want to go out for a walk in the park, nobody is going to stop us. If we want to say “(Insert explicative word here) (enter name here)” we can say so without the police busting through our door and arresting us. If we want to kiss our loved ones, we can. The freedoms I listed may come off as silly and trivial, but they are some of the simple things in life that make us human.

The freedom of emotion is one of the most overlooked freedoms as well. Love is one of our strongest emotions and being able to actively express it in word or in action is one of the greatest human freedoms indeed. If you have something to say to a loved one, don’t hold it in. You have the freedom to say it. Likewise if you are angry, feel free to express it. Although we think of emotions as irrational at times, there is always a reason behind our emotions and how we feel.

So if you want to tell your mom you love her but always felt that it was awkward or something, just go and do it. The worst thing that can happen is that your mom will give you a weird look but the best thing that can happen is that she tells you that she loves you too. Are you a guy and ever wanted to tell a close friend that you were thankful to have him as a friend but felt that telling him that would make you sound “gay”? Toss away those thoughts as well and get on top of that bromance. Guys have feelings too. Ever want to tell your significant other that you would give your life for them and that they meant everything in the world to you? Well chop off an arm as proof and toss it to them as a token of your love.

But in all seriousness, there is no “Thought Police” constantly monitoring your thoughts and your actions. We are all blessed to have the freedom of emotion, as well as a countless amount of other freedoms. So don’t be shy or timid. Take control of your life and do not cower at your emotions. Rather empower yourself and others with it. After all,

Big brother isn’t watching you.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s